Salinas runner creates safe races for pandemic in Monterey County

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A local runner found a creative solution to host a competitive race he missed due to a pandemic. “There was smoke and COVID-19 was happening. I was running on a treadmill in the garage trying to get out the smoke so I really wanted to run, ”said Ryan Commons. -19 Pandemic, Commons got creative. “The community was hungry for the racing community because of its competitiveness,” he said. Commons designed Race the Commons as a way to compete competitively during a pandemic. He created 10 different routes on the central coast, allowing runners to run the same route at different times. “The terrain and terrain of all races are completely different. They are located in Watsonville Slau, Fort Ord, Garland. The flattest course is the steepest two mile course with about 50 feet of climb. The course is a vertical mile half marathon at Garland Park, ”he said. Runners from across the state participated. All of the participants were of different ages and had different running abilities. From elite runners like Adam Roach, who won the Big Sur Marathon six times, to high school athletes, seniors and even parents with strollers. Race The Commons donates 50% of race registrations to local nonprofits related to public lands, accessibility, health and education. I understand. club. “The usual source of income for our scholarships is from participating in local races and receiving group donations. Therefore, even when there were hardly any races in the calendar year, this is what we are the elite of the Salinas Valley. Christopher Zepeda, Founder of The Running Club, said: The Salinas Valley Elite Running Club, of Monterey Peninsula College or Hartnell, to varsity or cross country athletes two years per year. We offer a time scholarship. “Sometimes a person with a disability feels like you have to work, you can’t go on, so the scholarship allows me to keep doing it. It gives you a little confidence. Someone sees my potential and maybe Zepeda said, “I’ll try.” It was also an opportunity to bring people together to run, give them the opportunity to run on COVID-19 and give back to what matters to runners, ”says Commons. The next race in Race Commons is a 10 mile course. At Fort Ord in October. You can find a link here to register: https://www.racethecommons.com/.

A local runner found a creative solution to host a competitive race he missed due to a pandemic.

“There was smoke and COVID-19 was happening. I was running on a treadmill in the garage trying to get out the smoke so I really wanted to run, ”said Ryan Commons.

So, at the height of the fire season and the COVID-19 pandemic, the Commons got creative.

“The community was hungry for the racing community because of its competitiveness,” he said.

Commons designed Race The Commons as a way to compete during a pandemic. He created 10 different routes on the central coast, allowing runners to run the same route at different times.

“The terrain and terrain of all races are completely different. They are in Fort Ord, Garland, with the slaves of Watsonville. The flattest course is a two mile course, with about 50 feet of climbing and more. The steep course is vertical. The Mile Half Marathon at Garland Park. “

Runners from across the state participated. All of the participants were of different ages and had different running abilities. From elite runners like Adam Roach, who won the Big Sur Marathon six times, to high school athletes, seniors and even parents with strollers. Race The Commons donates 50% of race registrations to local nonprofits related to public lands, accessibility, health and education. I understand. club.

“The usual source of income for our scholarships is to participate in local races and then donate to the group, so even when there were no races for almost a calendar year, it was the one of the last we did. It was a way to make sure you had the money. Christopher Zepeda, Founder of the Salinas Valley Elite Running Club, said:

The Salinas Valley Elite Running Club offers semester scholarships to community college athletes or cross country athletes from Monterey Peninsula College or Hartnell.

“Sometimes a disability gives you a little confidence that I can keep doing this because you feel like you have to work and you can’t keep doing it. Someone will see me and maybe me the possibilities, let’s try. “

“I have always received all the good that came from the running community and never really delivered what I wanted. It seems obvious to me. It’s about making people run. I was giving people an opportunity. I was able to run during COVID-19 and it was also an opportunity to give back to what matters to runners, ”says Commons.

The next Race Commons run is a 10 mile course in Fort Ord in October. Here you will find a link to register: https://www.racethecommons.com/..

Salinas runner creates safe races for pandemic in Monterey County Source link Salinas runner creates safe races for pandemic in Monterey County


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